Contents

Shedd Family


Contents
Vignettes

Densmore Family

Fleming Family

Morris / Litton Family

Shedd Family

Wheeler Family


Closson, Andrew Valentine
Closson, Claes Eric & Marta Linston
Closson & Shedd Familys
 
Koonce Family
 
Lampman's Arrive in the Colonies
Lampman, Esther Obituary
 
Morse, Anthony
 
Pratt, Susan Carol - Obituary
 
Shead, Helen Biography
Shed, Daniel Biography
Shed, Daniel Memorial Re-Dedication
Shed, Daniel Comes to New England
Family Reunion Poem - Lonnie Mair
Shedd, Manly & Sarah
Shedd, Mike - Obituary
Shedd, Rachael - 2002 All-America
Shedd, Sarah E. (Closson) Obituary
Shedd, Sally (Morse)
Shedd, William Nelson
Shedd, William Jr.
 
Smith, Terry
 
Contents

Family Histories

Shedd Family

Home

Pictures

Wheeler Family

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Pictures

Morris Family

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Pictures

The First Lampman's Arrive in the Colonies

The First Lampman's Arrive in the Colonies (US)-Their Story The emigrant Peter Lambman /Landtmann/Lampman and his family came to the area known as New York in 1709/1710 with many other poor, destitute Germans from the state of Hessen & the surrounding areas of Germany (Deutschland). These hard working, honest and loyal Germans built homes, cultivated land and thrived in very harsh conditions in these early years. Many of these Lampman families helped to settle early the states of New York, Vermont and lower provinces of Quebec, Ontario and the surrounding wilderness. They may not have been the first to adventure into a wild and rugged region, but they were among those early hardy German Palatines who ventured forth. Names such as Degman, Deckmann, Planck and Windecker are amongst the many which made the perilous trip with them.

Many of the Lampman family ancestors went to Canada as Loyalists during or after the Revolutionary War, while others remained in the United States. Some of these families were split due to this conflict and the subsequent War of 1812. About 1840 the Lampman family's in both Canada and the U.S. slowly began to migrate west into Ontario or to the midwestern states; Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota. James Lampman is noted as being in Wisconsin as early as 1837, with Lampmans in Michigan earlier than this date.

During and after the Civil War an influx of Lampman families as well as others were on the move to these states with visions of free or cheap land, a better life, work and opportunities. Many already had relatives living in these states, so good advice was taken on how to travel to their new destinations. Several known routes were taken from New York, Vermont and surrounding regions. Many of those in the upstate New York, Vermont or Quebec areas, went by ship on the Great Lakes to Detroit then by rail or ox wagen to Milwaukee, WI and onto LaCrosse, WI. Others like may ancestors came via ox wagen all the way from New York and Vermont, staying with relatives or friends along the way. The trip generally took 3 - 8 months, with 10-20 miles a day the average. The closer to their destination, the less miles were traveled per day, due to poor roads, muddy or impassible roads or no roads at all.

There weren't many railroad lines until the 1850's in Wisconsin. The second route from the lower parts of the above states went by rail predominantly to the Madison, WI area (which did not really exist then) or onto Galena, IL where there was plenty or work in the lead mines and on the river. No matter how they got to the Mississippi River region, the next step was usually by steamboat up the Mississippi or stagecoach, some rail or wagon to locations in Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota. The " great white pine forests " of Wisconsin offered many jobs to these hardy souls in the woods as well as on the waters of the mighty Mississippi River and it's tributaries. The various sawmill and related industries with farming opportunities were a result of this lumbering era. As the land was cleared, it was fertile and crops were planted. Minnesota and Iowa were premier in great land crops.

Welcome to what we call "God's Country" in Western Wisconsin. The beauty and splendor of Wisconsin rivers, forests and the gentle rolling hills and countryside is unmatched in it's simple scenery and majestic views along the Mississippi River. Enjoy all Wisconsin has to offer. Mark Twain rode this river and wrote of it often.

This Vignette is taken from the Greg Lanpman website www.LampmanLanding.com

Printable Copy

3/18/12